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The Daily Show springs tense showdown with Native Americans on Redskins fans

racebending:

The Redskins Nation citizens eagerly signed up, most of them knowing that they might be mocked in their interview with correspondent Jason Jones. But several hours into the Sept. 13 taping of the yet-to-air episode, the fans, all from Virginia, said they were suddenly confronted by a larger group of Native American activists — all of whom were in on the showdown prearranged by “The Daily Show.”

The encounter at a Dupont Circle hotel was so tense that an Alexandria fan said she left in tears and felt so threatened that she later called the police. She has told “The Daily Show” to leave her out of the segment but doesn’t know whether the producers will comply.

“This goes way beyond mocking. Poking fun is one thing, but that’s not what happened,” said Kelli O’Dell, 56, a former teacher who lives in Alexandria and doesn’t watch the show regularly. “It was disingenuous. The Native Americans accused me of things that were so wrong. I felt in danger. I didn’t consent to that. I am going to be defamed.”

If only the Native American activists protesting the racist R**** mascot knew what it was like to be falsely misrepresented and endangered without their consent, and defamed. They’d want to call the police, too.

In her essay "I’m Leaving!" White fragility in Racial Dialogues, Robin J. DiAngelo writes: ”fragility coupled with privilege will result in a response of resistance, indulgence in emotional incapacitation, exiting, or a combination of these.”

And they say people protesting the R**** mascot are the ones who are “too sensitive.”

Everyone knew the local elder who’d molested and raped his daughters and granddaughters for decades until he was arrested for touching another family’s girls; after four years in jail and another half dozen or so at a cabin downriver, he was back on the village tribal council. One of Geneva’s great aunts was molested and raped by an uncle for years; dozens of years later, the aunt’s grown daughter told her that the same uncle had molested her, too. Sometimes people pressed charges; most of the time, though, nothing happened. “These perverts travel from village to village, from potlatches to dances,” Geneva says. “And then they get drunk and you don’t know what they’re going to do.”…A local woman was gang raped until she could “barely walk.” A young boy was sexually assaulted by an older man and later killed himself. Tribal elders who command respect, but whose behavior doesn’t. “I’m still young and I’m already sick of it,” she said. “It’s happening in his house, in her house, even in your own bed.”

In its short history as a state, Alaska has earned an unnerving epithet: It is the rape capital of the U.S. At nearly 80 rapes per 100,000, according to the FBI Uniform Crime Report, Alaska’s rape rate is almost three times the national average; for child sexual assault, it’s nearly six times. And, according to the 2010 Alaska Victimization Survey, the most comprehensive data to date, 59 percent of Alaskan women have been victims of sexual assault, intimate partner violence, or both…a survey from 2006 that analyzed law enforcement data in Anchorage found Alaska Native women 9.7 times more likely than other Alaskan women to be victims of sexual assault.

In a state where hundreds of roadless communities are scattered across hundreds of thousands of miles, and where the storied rates of violence against women can hit 100 percent in some villages, silence is the norm, and violence is almost expected. Says detective Vandervalk, “You’ll get a Native girl who says, ‘My mom always tells me to wear two pairs of jeans at night to slow him down.’”

Rape Culture in the Alaskan Wilderness

we often talk about settler-perpetrated violence, and we should…but we have a sickness in our communities, that needs to be addressed. as the article points out, it does have roots in settler violence (boarding schools, colonial rape culture, etc), but acknowledging that doesn’t automatically bring healing or change. sexual violence is not traditional, but it is rapidly becoming a tradition passed down—some families are now at 3, 4, 5 generations of violence. this has to end. our survival—culturally and physically—depends on us learning to address the violence we perpetrate against one another. 

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

(Source: nitanahkohe)

And there is another American profession that has a significantly more alarming problem with domestic abuse. I’d urge everyone who believes in zero tolerance for NFL employees caught beating their wives or girlfriends to direct as much attention—or ideally, even more attention—at police officers who assault their partners. Several studies have found that the romantic partners of police officers suffer domestic abuse at rates significantly higher than the general population. And while all partner abuse is unacceptable, it is especially problematic when domestic abusers are literally the people that battered and abused women are supposed to call for help.
Police Have a Much Bigger Domestic Abuse Problem Than the NFL (via azspot)

theyoungradical:

jackpowerx:

stfurapeculture:

nezua:

negresse-intensa:

theyoungradical:

theneighbourhoodsuperhero:

Omar Khadr, a sixteen year old Guantanamo Bay detainee weeps uncontrollably, clutching at his face and hair as he calls out for his mother to save him from his torment. “Ya Ummi, Ya Ummi (Oh Mother, Oh Mother),” he wails repeatedly, hauntingly with each breath he takes.

The surveillance tapes, released by Khadr’s defence, show him left alone in an interrogation room for a “break” after he tried complaining to CSIS (Canadian Security Intelligence Service) officers about his poor health due to insufficient medical attention. Ignoring his complaints and trying to get him to make false confessions, the officers get frustrated with the sixteen year old’s tears and tell him to get himself together by the time they come back from their break.

“You don’t care about me. Nobody cares about me,” he sobs to them.

The tapes show how the officers manipulated Khadr into thinking that they were helping him because they were also Canadian and how they taunted him with the prospect of home (Canada), (good) food, and familial reunion.

Khadr, a Canadian, was taken into US custody at the age of fifteen, tortured and refused medical attention because he wouldn’t attest to being a member of Al Qaeda, even though he was shot three times in the chest and had shrapnel embedded in his eyes and right shoulder. As a result, Khadr’s left eye is now permanently blind, the vision in his right eye is deteriorating, he develops severe pain in his right shoulder when the temperature drops, and he suffers from extreme nightmares.

He has been incarcerated at Guantanamo Bay since 2002, suffering extremely harsh interrogations and torture (methods), and is now 25 years old.

27 now, and still imprisoned

i’m in complete shock. i’m so nauseous right now. how is this possible? i don’t know what to do w/ this information. i share it because i can’t imagine that anyone else knows about this. the boy has been incarcerated, tortured, and basically maimed allll w/out a trial. my heart hurts :/

Empire.

Omar is no longer in Guantanamo. Left without options, he pled guilty to war crimes so that he’d be given an eight year sentence and be able to transfer to a prison in Canada. He remains in prison there. His story is absolutely heartbreaking. This was a 15 year old boy who has been described as crying out for his mother, who slept holding a Mickey Mouse book one of his captors gave him. A teenager taken from his family, tortured, humiliated, threatened with rape, and falsely imprisoned for 12 years now. You can help Omar by writing to him, donating for his defense, and signing petitions for him. Please visit http://freeomarakhadr.com to learn more.

Look at these pictures. Burn the images into your minds.

This is the War on Terror.

Much like the War on Drugs, it aims to create prisoners rather than stop what it portends to be at war with.

Confining, torturing, and entrapping innocent people does not keep one person safe from any terror threat.

Not.

A single.

One.

This is what happens when “success” is measured by arrests and convictions. 

This is a microcosm of what we as a society - in the US and in any nation that explicitly or tacitly supports these tactics - has become.

We can’t be silent. We have to end this. We’re the only ones who can, because governments aren’t going to stop it - primarily because they’re the ones doing it.

His 28th birthday was September 19th

This reality is a bit harder to swallow: There are more white people in the US and Canada because the US and Canada were established using the systematic genocide of Native peoples, the theft of Native lands, and the labour of enslaved peoples in the past and immigrant peoples currently who were and are never meant to stay or survive.

And now you’re uncomfortable. Good.

When you accept and acknowledge that census figures reflect a long history of marginalization, it is preposterous to use these same figures as the benchmark to which you measure the inclusion of marginalized people.

There’s a great piece in the Toast about representation and diversity (‘Proportional Representation’ Has No Place In Diversity Discussions by Léonicka Valcius) today. (via whineandbeer)
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